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Frequently Asked Questions

1. Does UBM Canon accept application files?

2. Why do I have to send a color proof for my digital ad?

3. Can I just send a color laser proof?

4. Why do I have to send a digital ad checklist?

5. Do you accept files created by Microsoft Word, Harvard Graphics, Microsoft Publisher, or Microsoft PowerPoint?

6. My file was created to trim with bleed added outside of trim, but my PDF was rejected for not having bleed. How do I make a PDF with bleed?

7. You have informed me that my PDF has been rejected because it contains images in LAB color but I've double checked all of my images and they are in CMYK color mode. What's happening?

8. My PDF was rejected because of low-resolution images but all of my images are high resolution. How can this be?

9. I'm being told I have spot colors in my ad but if I've converted them to process color in my original file, why are you still seeing them?

10. I submitted an EPS file created in Adobe Illustrator with the fonts converted to outlines but you rejected my file because it still has active fonts in it. Why is this happening?

11. Can I submit a DCS file or a file with DCS files placed within it?

12. I want to submit a file using a Duotone image. Is this OK?

13. I submitted an EPS file made from QuarkXPress and it was rejected because the fonts are not embedded. Doesn't that happen automatically? How do I do that?

14. You've told me to resave my file with a preview but I did that for the original submission. Are you sure it doesn't have a preview?

15. I'm new to making PDFs and I want to learn more. Where should I go?

16. I submitted an ad to you a few months ago and our company recently changed e-mail addresses. Can you make this small change for us?

17. I'm having trouble fixing the problems with my file. Can someone please walk me through the process, step-by-step?

18. What is the best way to send my ad to UBM Canon?

1. Q: Does Canon accept application files?

A: No. Because of potential reproduction errors we cannot accept application files. Ads created in QuarkXPress, Adobe PageMaker, Abode InDesign, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe PhotoShop, Macromedia Freehand, etc. should be converted to one of our accepted formats, PDF, EPS, TIFF or PostScript, to ensure that they print correctly. See our Support section for further information.

2. Q: Why do I have to send a color proof for my digital ad?

A: The printer needs color guidance while your ad is on press.

3. Q: Can I just send a color laser proof?

A: We need a contract-quality, digital halftone proof pulled from your final file. A color laser should only be used for content. Color lasers vary greatly depending on the output device and how it is calibrated.

4. Q: Why do I have to send a digital ad checklist?

A: Actually, this is now an obsolete step. We no longer require advertisers to download and fill out our digital ad checklist because the process of making print ready files, such as PDFs, is much more elegant and simple than it used to be. However, it is still vital that you thoroughly review your files before sending them to us.

5. Q: Do you accept files created by Microsoft Word, Harvard Graphics, Microsoft Publisher, or Microsoft PowerPoint?

A: No. These applications are not designed for creating high resolution, CMYK files for print. You'll be unable to generate a file that meets our specifications to print correctly.

6. Q: My file was created to trim with bleed added outside of trim, but my PDF was rejected for not having bleed. How do I make a PDF with bleed?

A: The specific answer will depend on the application you're using and the method of creating a PDF that you're using. In general, when making your PDF, you should have the option to add bleed beyond the trim. This option may not be obvious to you at first. You may be required to investigate all the option windows you're presented with in order to find the bleed options. Your user manuals and the software publisher's online resources may provide some assistance here.

7. Q: You have informed me that my PDF has been rejected because it contains images in LAB color but I've double checked all of my images and they are in CMYK color mode. What's happening?

A: This is likely due to some or all of your images that have been saved from Photoshop as EPS files with PostScript Color Management turned on. To fix this problem, simply open your EPS images in Photoshop and resave them with PostScript Color Management turned off. To find and turn off this option, perform a Save As for each image. In the first window, name the file and choose a location to save it to. When you click the Save button, the EPS Options window will open. Find the PostScript Color Management option in the list and uncheck the box next to it. Click the OK button. You'll then need to update the link in your native application file and then make a new PDF.

8. Q: My PDF was rejected because of low-resolution images but all of my images are high resolution. How can this be?

A: The first thing we would ask of you is to double check your images. If the original images are all high resolution, double check the native application file in which you built the ad. Have any of the images been enlarged? If so, they may have been enlarged to the point that they have become low resolution. If not, and all of your images are truly high resolution, then the problem could be occurring when you are creating your final file (re: PDF, EPS, etc.). Where the problem is occurring is dependent on which application you are using and what method you are using to create your final file. The problem is most common when creating PDFs from page layout applications such as QuarkXPress and Adobe InDesign.

If you are using the older, more traditional two-step method of printing to a PostScript file and distilling to a PDF, you are most likely choosing an inappropriate PostScript Printer Driver (PPD) in the print dialog window when printing the PostScript file. If you choose an inappropriate PPD, the resolution of your images can be inadvertently lowered. This problem can be resolved by using an appropriate PPD, such as the AdobePDF PPD. Note: The step in the process where you select a PPD depends on the application you're using and the version of the application. You may find it necessary to do some searching to find it, as the location of this option is not always apparent. If it's not immediately apparent, try looking for buttons that say Options or Preferences. If you're unable to find it, refer to the manual that accompanied your software.

However, if you're using the newer, and far easier method of exporting a PDF directly from your native application file, you may be using an inappropriate Adobe PDF Preset or PDF Style setting. Again, the step in the process where you select this depends on the application you're using and the version of the application. You have the option to create your own PDF Preset or Style, however, there should be some defaults available that will work just fine. Some examples or good defaults to use are "High Quality Print", "Press Quality", "PDF/X-1a: 2001" (or newer), and "Press - High Quality/High Resolution".

9. Q: I'm being told I have spot colors in my ad but if I've converted them to process color in my original file, why are you still seeing them?

A: This is very common for QuarkXPress users but can be easily fixed. From the menu bar in QuarkXPress, choose Edit>Colors (or Shift+F12 from the keyboard) to bring up the Colors window. Select the color in question and click the Edit button. This brings up the Edit Color window. You may have already been here to change the Model from Pantone or RGB to CMYK but that's not enough. Below Model is a check box next to the words Spot Color. To complete the conversion of a spot color to process color, you MUST uncheck this box. Click OK and repeat as necessary. Note: If you have imported EPS files from other applications that may also contain spot colors, you'll need to open those files in their original applications and convert the spot colors from there. Refer to the software's user manual for further instructions.

10. Q: I submitted an EPS file created in Adobe Illustrator with the fonts converted to outlines but you rejected my file because it still has active fonts in it. Why is this happening?

A: The Create Outlines feature in Adobe Illustrator is a wonderful tool but it's also a bit sloppy. Even if you have done a Select All and performed Create Outlines, some stray text anchor points can still be left behind. As long as there are text anchor points present, even if there is no text in them, they will still make reference to a font. Fixing this problem is a simple matter of locating these points and deleting them. One method is to change the View from Preview to Outline (Command+Y). This reveals the stray points as little x's that can then be selected and deleted. You can also try using Object>Path>Clean Up, making sure that Stray Points and Empty Text Paths are checked. Additionally, you can try Select>Object>Stray Points or Select>Object>Text Objects, and then delete the resulting selections. Be careful when using Select>Object>Text Objects. If you still have unconverted text, it will select that text as well as the stray text points. As a final check, go to Type>Find Font. If there are any Fonts listed in the top window under Fonts In Document, you still have stray text points somewhere in the document. Keep finding and deleting until that window is empty. If the window is empty, save a new EPS file and then send that file to us.

11. Q: Can I submit a DCS file or a file with DCS files placed within it?

A: No. Our printer requests that we refrain from using these types of files. So unfortunately, we have to pass this request on to you. You'll need to find an alternate method of achieving the same result with a standard EPS file.

12. Q: I want to submit a file using a Duotone image. Is this OK?


A: Yes, with certain precautions. Always make sure the spot color in your Duotone file is named EXACTLY the same as it's in your layout application's color palette. If there is ANY difference in the name, even just one letter difference, your final ad file will likely not separate properly and you'll be asked to submit a corrected file. The easiest way to avoid this issue is to create your duotone first. Next, create a blank document in your page layout application of choice and place the duotone image. Next, build your ad as normal. If you intend to use the spot color elsewhere in your ad, make sure to use the spot color that imported along with the duotone. As always, you're encouraged to check your work prior to submitting ad files to us. You can print separations of your finished file to make sure that it is indeed separating properly.

13. Q: I submitted an EPS file made from QuarkXPress and it was rejected because the fonts are not embedded. Doesn't that happen automatically? How do I do that?


A: Out of the box, QuarkXPress 6 or older is not able to embed the fonts into an EPS file. You'll need an additional Xtension to allow QuarkXPress to do this for you. As we are InDesign users, we cannot offer any specific recommendations, but an internet search should turn up several options. On the other hand, QuarkXPress 7 or newer has the ability to embed fonts in EPS files without the need of an additional Xtension.

14. Q: You've told me to resave my file with a preview but I did that for the original submission. Are you sure it doesn't have a preview?

A: We are quite sure. If you transmitted an uncompressed (Stuffed or Zipped) file to us electronically by e-mail or FTP, the preview may have been inadvertently stripped away from the file. This is most common with EPS files. The solution is to compress your file before transmission. Mac users can use Stuff-It or similar application and PC users can use Winzip or similar application. This ensures that your file remains intact and protected during transmission.

15. Q: I'm new to making PDFs and I want to learn more. Where should I go?


A: A simple Internet search for PDF will yield a tremendous number of results but the best source has always been the creator of the PDF format – Adobe! Their online Support section at adobe.com is incredible. The amount of information there is staggering. Even seasoned veterans can find new and useful information. Be sure to try the User to User Forums. More than likely, if you have a question, it's already been answered by the generous folks that read and post regularly. If you don't see your question, simply post it. You'll be amazed at how quickly it gets answered!

16. Q: I submitted an ad to you a few months ago and our company recently changed e-mail addresses. Can you make this small change for us?

A: No. Because of liability issues and the protection of our advertisers, we have a strict policy of not altering electronic files, no matter how minute the change is.

17. Q: I'm having trouble fixing the problems with my file. Can someone please walk me through the process, step-by-step?

A: Unfortunately, we can't. Our workload does not permit us to provide live, step-by-step phone support. If you have a specific question or problem, we're happy to offer suggestions but we'll be unable to guide you through them while you work on the file over the phone. However, in most cases, your questions can be answered by the user's manual that accompanied your software or the publisher's online support services.

18. Q: What is the best way to send my ad to UBM Canon?

A: Electronically, via email, or FTP (file transfer protocol). It's fast, it's free and allows us to receive your file far more quickly than postal service, FedEx, or UPS. See our Send section for more details. Note: We can receive files through email as large as 5Mb, so anything small enough to fit on a floppy disk will be small enough to go through email.